Teaching Online Title Beginner's Guide Heading with Picture of Ignition  

Multimedia

Straight text on a computer screen can be boring. Graphics, video, sound, and animation can make a course more interesting and help students learn. But multimedia should not be used just for the sake of using it. If it does not truly serve a purpose, students will simply skip the elements or become even more confused by their inclusion.

 

Sidekick - Tools that inspire
  • Sidekick is an innovative program that combines seven free resources from the California Community College Chancellor's Office under one easy-to-access umbrella. With Sidekick, you have the tools you need to create inspiring and engaging content that meets the needs of diverse audiences, tough budgets and ever-changing regulations.
  • Included are:
    • 3C Media Solutions
    • @ONE
    • ATPC Tools
    • DECT Tools
    • CCC Confer
    • EduStream
    • HTCTU

Graphics

reading

  • Use royalty-free clipart (see sidebar), a digital camera, or drawing programs to make your own graphics
  • Use file formats:
      • drawings/line art: use .gif
      • photos: use .jpg
  • Make file size small (width and height: 100-200 pixels)
  • Insert into Powerpoint, Word documents, Bb directly (for reducing file size in PowerPoint, see the side bar in Content)

Video

film strip

  • Thousands of captioned streaming videos are provided by the Cuyamaca College Library. These videos can be linked to or embedded into Blackboard for access online.
  • Record your own computer monitor actions with screen recording/motion capture programs and save these as a video file (see Programs/Applications)
  • Use a digital camera, camcorder or cell phone to capture live action
  • Use Cuyamaca Video Room Instructions (Rooms B162, B253, B258, B262 - call 660-4415)
  • Use Flash or Real video format for compatibility with Windows and Mac (see Sorenson Squeeze in Programs & Applications)
  • Students can download lectures (audio or video) to their iPod or Smartphone (see sidebar for explanation of podcasting).
  • Most agree that a "talking head" videos over about 4 minutes are not effective - include visuals, demonstrations, footage along with your narration
  • Examples created by CC Faculty

Audio

speakers

  • Record with an inexpensive microphone (USB connection) or use an iPod/MP3 recorder, digital camera, SmartPhone (see the sidebar for hints on recording narration)
  • Use a sound editing program (see Programs & Applications)
  • If you do not want to record, you can use text-to-speech programs to synthesize speech from text and save these as MP3 files (see sidebar)
  • Insert into PowerPoint as synchronized narration or directly into Bb
  • Use narration to explain a still picture, diagram, chart, a personal experience, quotations, instructions
  • Music (either royalty-free or self-recorded) can work well in PP presentations and Flash animations

Animation

particle spinning

  • Use either gif for short, simple, looped animations or Flash for complex designs (see Programs & Applications)
  • Flash can have longer complex timelines with interactivity
  • For a discussion of avatars, see Other

 

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Sidebar - In Focus

filmSTREAMING VIDEO provided by the CC Library

 

 

Stack of books ROYALTY-FREE MEDIA>
Links to various sites where clipart, sounds, music, stock video can be purchased.

 

Test TubesRECORDING NARRATION>
Here are some hints on recording your own narrations.

 

Test TubesTEXT-TO-SPEECH>
Turn text into your own narration.

 

Two ArrowsPODCASTING EXPLAINED>
YouTube videos giving the essentials.

 

Two ArrowsINTERVIEW>
Steve Weinert on how he uses the iPod to record lectures.